Category Archives: Humor

Keeping Your Team Motivated

 

Congratulations!  You’ve hired a new team member! They’re up and running, but how do you keep your new hire and team inspired? If you take a cue from House, you’ll know that you must keep the team challenged but also need to offer guidance.

 In order for your team to be efficient, they need to stay motivated. But it can be a challenge so remember that as a manager it’s important that you… 

 Take the time to define your management style – You cant inspire a team if you don’t understand how to effectively manage.

  • Get to know each team member and their work style – A team is a team, but it’s comprised of individuals. Don’t lose sight of that.
  • Communicate efficiently – Knowing that communication is key and providing a clear vision can keep your team productive.
  • Invest in your team – They need to understand their role in your team’s initiatives and that they are essential to your organization’s success.

 We hope you’ve enjoyed our HOUSE series and that our tips have provided you some food for thought.  Keep in mind that you’re not alone; we’re here for you (and we won’t roll our eyes!). We work with managers every day to provide guidance and insight into hiring and retention practices.

 

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Preparing for the New Member of Your Team

Bringing your new physician, advanced practitioner or executive up to speed as quickly as possible is a crucial first step in their success.

 Welcome your new employee – Introduce them to the team and other key colleagues.  A great way to start the day is a welcome breakfast or coffee.  Not only will it welcome your new employee, but your team will love the treats as well! Unlike House, make sure your welcome is sincere. His sarcasm was easily detectable when Martha Masters joined his team.

  • Workspace – This should go without saying, but be sure that your new hire has everything ready to go in their work area including computer software, phone, email, etc.
  • Assign a team member to help out – It’s a great way for a new employee to bond with a team member and put them at ease.
  • Give them the low down – Go over processes, current issues, patients, and other key information that they need to do their job.  Also, be clear about your expectations of the person and this position.

 

House Hiring Tip #7 – The Cost of a Bad Hire

Hiring the wrong person can affect not only your organization’s bottom line, but your team’s morale and productivity as well. In fact, the average hiring mistake can cost up to three-times the annual salary of the position, considering the cost of termination, replacement, and loss of productivity during training and learning curve.  Taking steps to ensure that you’re on track to hire the right person is key to prevent a bad decision, so be sure to.

Ask detailed questions during the interview process and listen for insight into why someone says they’re “dependable” or “a team player.”  Always ask for examples to support their statements. 

  • Interview, interview, interview – The phone screen, a first interview and then bringing the top candidates back in for a final, or second interview to see the candidate in your setting and interact with your team is crucial. Personality and group dynamics should always be considered – strong personalities like House’s unique outlook may conflict with your team and lead to exasperated staff likeWilson.
  • Check References – Be sure you get at least three references.  Former managers and co-workers are good choices.  For the more junior positions, college professors are fine as well. 
  • Be confident you have the right candidate for the right job – you may interview someone and think that they “could” be a good fit for the position, but may lack some of the skills or experience.  Focus on the job description to stay on track to select the right person for the position.

 

House Hiring Tip #6 – References

“I’ve found that when you want to know the truth about someone that someone is probably the last person you should ask.” –  Dr. Greg House

Ever wary of trusting anyone, House would appreciate the next crucial step in the process, which can shed some light onto the candidate.

Speaking with a candidate’s references is not just to determine an applicant’s weaknesses, but to gain insight into the candidate’s personality, work style and ethics.  References should add to the snapshot you’re creating of the candidate.

To get the most out of your reference calls:

Speak with a variety of contacts – A peer, manager and perhaps a direct report will help you get a perspective on the candidate from different view points.

  • Get the facts – Confirm dates, position title and responsibilities.  Get qualitative information to gain insight into the candidate’s work style.  How does the person work with others?  Are they a team player or lone ranger?
  • Listen – People will often reveal a great deal about someone if you ask an open ended question and just listen.  Include inquiries into skill level, professionalism, strengths and weaknesses, and other points that are relevant to your position.
  • Know the law – You must always get permission from the candidate to speak with their references.  Be sure you understand the EEOC guidelines for conducting a reference check as well.

House Hiring Tips #5 – The Interview

You’ve reviewed the resumes, completed the phone screens, and now it’s time to start scheduling face-to-face meetings with the physician, advanced practitioner or executive candidates you believe are qualified for the job. 

So how do you conduct a successful interview?  Just follow the tips below on what to do. For starters, you may want to look a bit more approachable than House!

 Be prepared – Review the candidate’s resume once again and keep it in front of you.

  • Manage the time – Have an agenda and schedule for each interview.  Be sure to provide them to any team members participating in the process as well.   
  • Set the tone – After introducing yourself and thanking the candidate for coming in, be sure to explain the interview process and provide a brief overview of the company and the position.
  • Actively listen – And take good notes. 
  • Observe – In addition to listening, observe the candidate’s body language and how they present themselves. (Even if an answer isn’t what you were hoping to hear, leave the eye rolling to House!)
  • Steer clear of inappropriate questions – Be sure you understand best hiring practices and avoid questions that are inappropriate or even illegal.
  • Sell the position – Be sure to present the position, your organization and what you have to offer in a positive light.

House Hiring Tip # 4 – The Phone Interview: Are You Using Proper Phone Etiquette?

So you have a pile of resumes that seem to meet your criteria, now what?

The next step in the hiring process of a physician, advanced practitioner or executive is the phone interview or phone screen. Not only is it a great way to get a preview of each candidate’s personality, but it can also provide a rapport building opportunity in advance of the first meeting. Need to freshen up on your phone etiquette? Just follow these phone interview tips and you’ll be the interview chief in no time!

• Schedule a specific time with clear instructions of when you’ll be calling the candidate.

• Review and organize the job description, as well as the candidate’s resume and experience prior to the conversation so you have everything in front of you.

• Prepare your questions and be sure to use the same format for each candidate so you’re comparing the same qualification criteria.

• Introduce yourself and provide a brief overview of the organization and position to start (you’re promoting yourself and your organization just as much as the candidate is trying to impress you, so keep this in mind. You don’t want to have a House-like attitude and scare off a potentially great hire!).

• Listen attentively and take detailed notes.

• Conclude the call by thanking the candidate and letting them know what the next steps are in the interview process.

Did you miss Tip #3 What To Look for in Resumes?

Stay tuned for Tip #5 on the main hiring event…the in-person interview.

House Hiring Tip #3 – What To Look for In Resumes

Hiring isn’t easy. Taking the next step in the hiring process of physicians, advanced practitioners and executives can be one of the most challenging. So for those of you who aren’t risk-takers like House, we’ve put together a few suggestions for reviewing your candidates’ job credentials.

• Carve out time each day for resume review.

• Refer to the job description to help you stay focused and be sure you’re not missing anything.

• Scan the resume for typos – Typos indicate a lack of attention to detail.

• Review experience – Does the candidate have the skills and experience relevant to your organization and the open position?

• Look for any unexplained gaps in employment. This may be a warning sign that this person job hops, which could cost you time and money.

• Assess whether the candidate takes the time to fine-tune their resume to your job description. Did they list specific skills or research related to the position? If so, extra points should be given for their attention to detail.

Once you’ve reviewed the individual resumes, it’s time to compare candidates and choose those who meet your job requirements. Now you’re ready to move into the next step in the hiring process, the phone screen.

Did you catch Tip #2 Power Networking?

What To Look for In Resumes and Portfolios is coming up next!

House Hiring Tip #2 – Power Networking

Networking – the art of connecting, socializing and interacting with colleagues – is an essential piece to finding the best candidate for your physician, advanced practice and executive healthcare positions. We say it to candidates all the time, but as a hiring manager, are you using networking to your advantage? Have you added social media to your networking?

Social networking through LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook is a great way to maintain and develop relationships and keep your finger on the pulse of who’s who. Social networks are where you want to be to tap into talent – Studies show that 1 in 6 job seekers found their last job through an online social network, and 86% percent of job seekers have a social network profile. Demonstrate your medical industry expertise on LinkedIn by answering your network’s Questions and interacting in Groups. You can also utilize a blog to showcase and share industry specific knowledge, which can be shared across all social platforms to resonate a buzz.

Don’t dismiss the power of networking – you never know when a highly qualified doctor like Foreman will tell his “House,” “I don’t want to turn into you” and seek a new position.

We work with medical professionals all day, every day. We’d love to help expand your networking capabilities and get you connected with the best talent in the business.

Did you miss Tip #1 Writing the Job Description?

Stand by for House’s next tip, What To Look for In Resumes.

House Hiring Tip #1 – The First Step to Hiring Lucky #13: Writing the Job Description

Putting a job description together seems simple enough, right? But if not constructed precisely, you may find yourself buried waist deep with resumes from candidates that don’t hit the mark, especially in this economy. Thus, the first step is crucial in communicating to prospective candidates exactly what you’re looking for.

While House resorted to numbering his candidates 1 through 40 and slowly eliminating them, specific and detailed job descriptions will lower the chances of having to sort through piles of unqualified candidates. He eventually chose #13, but with much wasted time and effort.

A great way to approach the job description is to think of it as a “reverse resume.” This will help you organize the skills you’re seeking to provide a snapshot of the responsibilities and tasks the job entails. Don’t rely solely on a job’s history as you’re putting together a job description for today. Focus instead on what the job needs to be in light of the organization’s current needs and long-term objectives.

A well-written job description consists of more than a laundry list of the tasks and responsibilities that the job entails. It reflects a sense of priorities.

A task is what the person in the job will actually do. Qualifications are the skills, attributes, or credentials a person needs to perform each task. Clarify the actual tasks and responsibilities before you start thinking about what special attributes will be needed by the person who will be fulfilling those responsibilities.

Credentials (such as degrees and licenses) are absolute necessities in some jobs. The thing you want to make sure of, however, is that whatever credentials you establish have a direct bearing on the candidate’s ability to become a top performer.

The job you describe must be truly doable. When you’re lumping several tasks into the same job description, make sure that you’re not creating a job that very few people could fill.

Last but not least, it’s always a clever idea to review the description with your manager and other team members to be sure you haven’t missed anything.

Dr. House on Hiring – Diagnosis & Treatment

Hiring and managing healthcare and medical staff is not always easy and while at times taping one’s mouth closed may seem like a viable option, we hope our tips give you a better choice! Hugh Laurie’s character Gregory House, M.D., of the hit series HOUSE, is sarcastic and dubious, but also very intelligent as he uses those traits to his advantage. Despite his coveted ability to find the mysterious diagnosis and last minute life saving treatment, he’s not easy to work with or work for. Courtesy of this quirky and unconventional doctor, we’ll provide some insights on interacting with candidates and keeping your team motivated.

“We all make mistakes, and we all pay a price,” according to House, and knowledge is power when it comes to hiring practices and team building.

Tip #1 coming soon!