Tag Archives: House

Keeping Your Team Motivated

 

Congratulations!  You’ve hired a new team member! They’re up and running, but how do you keep your new hire and team inspired? If you take a cue from House, you’ll know that you must keep the team challenged but also need to offer guidance.

 In order for your team to be efficient, they need to stay motivated. But it can be a challenge so remember that as a manager it’s important that you… 

 Take the time to define your management style – You cant inspire a team if you don’t understand how to effectively manage.

  • Get to know each team member and their work style – A team is a team, but it’s comprised of individuals. Don’t lose sight of that.
  • Communicate efficiently – Knowing that communication is key and providing a clear vision can keep your team productive.
  • Invest in your team – They need to understand their role in your team’s initiatives and that they are essential to your organization’s success.

 We hope you’ve enjoyed our HOUSE series and that our tips have provided you some food for thought.  Keep in mind that you’re not alone; we’re here for you (and we won’t roll our eyes!). We work with managers every day to provide guidance and insight into hiring and retention practices.

 

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House Hiring Tip # 4 – The Phone Interview: Are You Using Proper Phone Etiquette?

So you have a pile of resumes that seem to meet your criteria, now what?

The next step in the hiring process of a physician, advanced practitioner or executive is the phone interview or phone screen. Not only is it a great way to get a preview of each candidate’s personality, but it can also provide a rapport building opportunity in advance of the first meeting. Need to freshen up on your phone etiquette? Just follow these phone interview tips and you’ll be the interview chief in no time!

• Schedule a specific time with clear instructions of when you’ll be calling the candidate.

• Review and organize the job description, as well as the candidate’s resume and experience prior to the conversation so you have everything in front of you.

• Prepare your questions and be sure to use the same format for each candidate so you’re comparing the same qualification criteria.

• Introduce yourself and provide a brief overview of the organization and position to start (you’re promoting yourself and your organization just as much as the candidate is trying to impress you, so keep this in mind. You don’t want to have a House-like attitude and scare off a potentially great hire!).

• Listen attentively and take detailed notes.

• Conclude the call by thanking the candidate and letting them know what the next steps are in the interview process.

Did you miss Tip #3 What To Look for in Resumes?

Stay tuned for Tip #5 on the main hiring event…the in-person interview.

House Hiring Tip #3 – What To Look for In Resumes

Hiring isn’t easy. Taking the next step in the hiring process of physicians, advanced practitioners and executives can be one of the most challenging. So for those of you who aren’t risk-takers like House, we’ve put together a few suggestions for reviewing your candidates’ job credentials.

• Carve out time each day for resume review.

• Refer to the job description to help you stay focused and be sure you’re not missing anything.

• Scan the resume for typos – Typos indicate a lack of attention to detail.

• Review experience – Does the candidate have the skills and experience relevant to your organization and the open position?

• Look for any unexplained gaps in employment. This may be a warning sign that this person job hops, which could cost you time and money.

• Assess whether the candidate takes the time to fine-tune their resume to your job description. Did they list specific skills or research related to the position? If so, extra points should be given for their attention to detail.

Once you’ve reviewed the individual resumes, it’s time to compare candidates and choose those who meet your job requirements. Now you’re ready to move into the next step in the hiring process, the phone screen.

Did you catch Tip #2 Power Networking?

What To Look for In Resumes and Portfolios is coming up next!

House Hiring Tip #2 – Power Networking

Networking – the art of connecting, socializing and interacting with colleagues – is an essential piece to finding the best candidate for your physician, advanced practice and executive healthcare positions. We say it to candidates all the time, but as a hiring manager, are you using networking to your advantage? Have you added social media to your networking?

Social networking through LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook is a great way to maintain and develop relationships and keep your finger on the pulse of who’s who. Social networks are where you want to be to tap into talent – Studies show that 1 in 6 job seekers found their last job through an online social network, and 86% percent of job seekers have a social network profile. Demonstrate your medical industry expertise on LinkedIn by answering your network’s Questions and interacting in Groups. You can also utilize a blog to showcase and share industry specific knowledge, which can be shared across all social platforms to resonate a buzz.

Don’t dismiss the power of networking – you never know when a highly qualified doctor like Foreman will tell his “House,” “I don’t want to turn into you” and seek a new position.

We work with medical professionals all day, every day. We’d love to help expand your networking capabilities and get you connected with the best talent in the business.

Did you miss Tip #1 Writing the Job Description?

Stand by for House’s next tip, What To Look for In Resumes.

House Hiring Tip #1 – The First Step to Hiring Lucky #13: Writing the Job Description

Putting a job description together seems simple enough, right? But if not constructed precisely, you may find yourself buried waist deep with resumes from candidates that don’t hit the mark, especially in this economy. Thus, the first step is crucial in communicating to prospective candidates exactly what you’re looking for.

While House resorted to numbering his candidates 1 through 40 and slowly eliminating them, specific and detailed job descriptions will lower the chances of having to sort through piles of unqualified candidates. He eventually chose #13, but with much wasted time and effort.

A great way to approach the job description is to think of it as a “reverse resume.” This will help you organize the skills you’re seeking to provide a snapshot of the responsibilities and tasks the job entails. Don’t rely solely on a job’s history as you’re putting together a job description for today. Focus instead on what the job needs to be in light of the organization’s current needs and long-term objectives.

A well-written job description consists of more than a laundry list of the tasks and responsibilities that the job entails. It reflects a sense of priorities.

A task is what the person in the job will actually do. Qualifications are the skills, attributes, or credentials a person needs to perform each task. Clarify the actual tasks and responsibilities before you start thinking about what special attributes will be needed by the person who will be fulfilling those responsibilities.

Credentials (such as degrees and licenses) are absolute necessities in some jobs. The thing you want to make sure of, however, is that whatever credentials you establish have a direct bearing on the candidate’s ability to become a top performer.

The job you describe must be truly doable. When you’re lumping several tasks into the same job description, make sure that you’re not creating a job that very few people could fill.

Last but not least, it’s always a clever idea to review the description with your manager and other team members to be sure you haven’t missed anything.