Tag Archives: talent

More on Resume Fraud

August 21, 2012 By Leave a Comment

By Maureen Aylward

The CEO of Yahoo lied on his resume and was forced out. Several other high profile CEOs have done the same in industry and academia. We asked our Zintro experts to offer tools and ideas that boards of directors or company executives can use to research and combat resume fraud.
Don Richard, a healthcare services director and recruiter, says that people are waking up to the reality that the competition for top talent is here to stay. “Unfortunately, few have woken up to the reality that it is not as simple as once thought to trust the resumes of the individuals being considered for top posts in organizations,” he says. “As a recruiter, I have spent the last 12 years finding the best talent for clients, and I am still shocked when I hear stories like the dismissal of the Yahoo CEO for an oversight that seems so easily avoidable.”

Richard says that it may seem counterintuitive to think that paying a top recruiter can save a company money, but consider the cost of hiring the wrong employee. “An experienced recruiter brings years of expertise in evaluating human capital to the job and takes the time to research the historical background of each candidate,” says Richard. “The internet has made it easier to verify facts if you know where to look and take the time to conduct the research. That is where a trained nationally certified recruiter would be a great benefit.”

Warren Olson, a former high profile private investigator in Southeast Asia, says as a rule of thumb, he advises company directors/HR executives to take little notice of academic credentials until such time as you have made a shortlist of candidates. “At that stage, without exception, employers must validate all documentation by contacting the alleged issuing body directly and asking for confirmation,” he says. “In this day and age, fraudulent certification can be produced in moments. In South East Asia, fake copies often originating from Malaysia are identical to the real thing.”

Olson says that as a basic reference, ask the candidate to name his or her mentors. “You spend a number of years completing degrees and work closely with course mentors, so any legitimate graduate will know immediately who taught or coached them,” he says.

What do you think?

http://blog.zintro.com/2012/08/21/more-on-resume-fraud/

 

Preparing for the New Member of Your Team

Bringing your new physician, advanced practitioner or executive up to speed as quickly as possible is a crucial first step in their success.

 Welcome your new employee – Introduce them to the team and other key colleagues.  A great way to start the day is a welcome breakfast or coffee.  Not only will it welcome your new employee, but your team will love the treats as well! Unlike House, make sure your welcome is sincere. His sarcasm was easily detectable when Martha Masters joined his team.

  • Workspace – This should go without saying, but be sure that your new hire has everything ready to go in their work area including computer software, phone, email, etc.
  • Assign a team member to help out – It’s a great way for a new employee to bond with a team member and put them at ease.
  • Give them the low down – Go over processes, current issues, patients, and other key information that they need to do their job.  Also, be clear about your expectations of the person and this position.

 

House Hiring Tip #7 – The Cost of a Bad Hire

Hiring the wrong person can affect not only your organization’s bottom line, but your team’s morale and productivity as well. In fact, the average hiring mistake can cost up to three-times the annual salary of the position, considering the cost of termination, replacement, and loss of productivity during training and learning curve.  Taking steps to ensure that you’re on track to hire the right person is key to prevent a bad decision, so be sure to.

Ask detailed questions during the interview process and listen for insight into why someone says they’re “dependable” or “a team player.”  Always ask for examples to support their statements. 

  • Interview, interview, interview – The phone screen, a first interview and then bringing the top candidates back in for a final, or second interview to see the candidate in your setting and interact with your team is crucial. Personality and group dynamics should always be considered – strong personalities like House’s unique outlook may conflict with your team and lead to exasperated staff likeWilson.
  • Check References – Be sure you get at least three references.  Former managers and co-workers are good choices.  For the more junior positions, college professors are fine as well. 
  • Be confident you have the right candidate for the right job – you may interview someone and think that they “could” be a good fit for the position, but may lack some of the skills or experience.  Focus on the job description to stay on track to select the right person for the position.

 

House Hiring Tip #6 – References

“I’ve found that when you want to know the truth about someone that someone is probably the last person you should ask.” –  Dr. Greg House

Ever wary of trusting anyone, House would appreciate the next crucial step in the process, which can shed some light onto the candidate.

Speaking with a candidate’s references is not just to determine an applicant’s weaknesses, but to gain insight into the candidate’s personality, work style and ethics.  References should add to the snapshot you’re creating of the candidate.

To get the most out of your reference calls:

Speak with a variety of contacts – A peer, manager and perhaps a direct report will help you get a perspective on the candidate from different view points.

  • Get the facts – Confirm dates, position title and responsibilities.  Get qualitative information to gain insight into the candidate’s work style.  How does the person work with others?  Are they a team player or lone ranger?
  • Listen – People will often reveal a great deal about someone if you ask an open ended question and just listen.  Include inquiries into skill level, professionalism, strengths and weaknesses, and other points that are relevant to your position.
  • Know the law – You must always get permission from the candidate to speak with their references.  Be sure you understand the EEOC guidelines for conducting a reference check as well.

Confidence is key in a succesful job search

Very few situations in life can hurt your confidence and self esteem as much as trying to find a job. It is extremely difficult to keep a positive attitude especially in the current economic environment.

The formal process of finding a new job may seem like it is draining the life out of you. It might seem as if it is taking the best parts of you away when you need them most. You cannot let this happen. Losing confidence did not happen in one day and it will not come back fully in a day either.

You need to take small steps each day toward your overall goal. Things will get better but until then, here are a few tips to keep you confident and strong.

Set daily and weekly goals for yourself. And achieve a majority of them.  Prove to yourself each week that you are getting somewhere in your search.

Find a career expert. Connect with an employment expert who can help you through this process.  A recruiter, career coach or resume writer can help a great deal.  A certified recruiter will have the inside track on a companies hiring plan before they make it public knowledge or they will be able to market your skills to a company who has a current need.

Always be ready to interview. Stop thinking about the ways you have always done things and be open to new ideas and techniques.  Research interview styles and prepare yourself with possible questions you could be asked.

Keep your mind sharp. Engage in activities which could expand your skills and value as a job applicant. Take a class or read a book on a skill that you have always wanted to add to your resume but never found the time earlier. This is a great time to do the things you have dreamed of.

Counter offer? Why would I accept a counter offer?

Let’s face it: When someone quits, it’s often a poor a reflection on the boss. Unless you’re really incompetent or a destructive thorn in his side, the boss might look bad by “allowing” you to go. His immediate gut reaction is to do whatever it takes to keep you from leaving until he’s ready for you to go on his terms – that’s human nature.  Unfortunately for your boss, it’s also human nature to want to stay where you’re comfortable unless your work life is utter misery.  Career changes, like all ventures into the unknown, are tough. That’s why bosses know they can usually entice you to stay by pressing the right buttons.

Before you succumb to a tempting counteroffer, consider these universal employment truths:

  • Any situation in which an employee is forced to get an outside offer before the present employer will suggest a raise, promotion or better working conditions, is cause for suspicion.
  • No matter what your company says when making its counteroffer, from now on you’ll be considered a fidelity risk. Having now demonstrated your lack of loyalty (for whatever reason) to the company, you’ll lose your status as a “team player” and your place in the inner circle.
  • Counteroffers are usually nothing more than a stalling device to give your employer time to replace you.
  • Your reasons for wanting to leave still exist. Conditions are just made a bit more tolerable in the short term because of the raise, promotion or promises made to keep you. You also have no way of knowing to what extent these promises will be kept.
  • The potential opportunities your new position can provide will most likely outweigh what your current company has been willing to provide (or you wouldn’t have sought something new!).

The bottom line: Counteroffers are only made in response to a threat to quit. Will you have to solicit an offer and threaten to quit every time you deserve better working conditions?

Companies in sync with their employees don’t need to make counteroffers… EVER! Their policies are fair and equitable, and they are in touch with your level of job satisfaction. They won’t be subjected to “counteroffer coercion” or what they perceive as blackmail, and they won’t need to be.

If the urge to accept a counteroffer hits you, continue to clean out your desk as you count your blessings… you’re on to something better.

Key ideas from this article have been taken from “Counteroffer Acceptance: Road to Career Ruin” by Paul Hawkinson, NATIONAL BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT WEEKLY (Published by the Wall Street Journal: Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

Dress your best when interviewing!

Dressing in appropriate attire is crucial for the interview. The first judgment an interviewer makes is going to be based on how you look and what you are wearing. That’s why it’s always important to dress professionally for a job interview, even if the work environment is casual. It’s better to be over dressed than under dressed. Crazy costuming like Elliot and J.D. are showcasing isn’t going to give the best impression. Rather than think you are suited for their facility, the interviewer may think you’d be better off working at a Renaissance Faire. If you’re STILL not sure on how to dress, then we recommend checking in with your recruiter.

Don Richard – Vlog12: Do you have a recruiter by your side?

How important is to your organization to secure the very best talent possible? If you need to have the best people you need to have the best recruiter. Too many companies trust their recruitment efforts to a voice on the phone who tells them that they can help only to never hear from them again. You need to work with a recruiter who takes the time to get to know you and your organization inside and out. Choose wisely as it could be the difference between a long term employee helping your business grow versus an empty chair gathering dust.

Don Richard – Vlog10: critical job opening that needs to be filled quickly

We seek out experts in our everyday lives, plumbers, architects,  teaching professionals the list is endless. Why is it when there is a need to hire new staff companies not reaching out to recruitment  specialists more frequently? We are the experts in our field and the  ROI for the investment makes perfect sense in the current economic climate.