Category Archives: Humor

Counter offer? Why would I accept a counter offer?

Let’s face it: When someone quits, it’s often a poor a reflection on the boss. Unless you’re really incompetent or a destructive thorn in his side, the boss might look bad by “allowing” you to go. His immediate gut reaction is to do whatever it takes to keep you from leaving until he’s ready for you to go on his terms – that’s human nature.  Unfortunately for your boss, it’s also human nature to want to stay where you’re comfortable unless your work life is utter misery.  Career changes, like all ventures into the unknown, are tough. That’s why bosses know they can usually entice you to stay by pressing the right buttons.

Before you succumb to a tempting counteroffer, consider these universal employment truths:

  • Any situation in which an employee is forced to get an outside offer before the present employer will suggest a raise, promotion or better working conditions, is cause for suspicion.
  • No matter what your company says when making its counteroffer, from now on you’ll be considered a fidelity risk. Having now demonstrated your lack of loyalty (for whatever reason) to the company, you’ll lose your status as a “team player” and your place in the inner circle.
  • Counteroffers are usually nothing more than a stalling device to give your employer time to replace you.
  • Your reasons for wanting to leave still exist. Conditions are just made a bit more tolerable in the short term because of the raise, promotion or promises made to keep you. You also have no way of knowing to what extent these promises will be kept.
  • The potential opportunities your new position can provide will most likely outweigh what your current company has been willing to provide (or you wouldn’t have sought something new!).

The bottom line: Counteroffers are only made in response to a threat to quit. Will you have to solicit an offer and threaten to quit every time you deserve better working conditions?

Companies in sync with their employees don’t need to make counteroffers… EVER! Their policies are fair and equitable, and they are in touch with your level of job satisfaction. They won’t be subjected to “counteroffer coercion” or what they perceive as blackmail, and they won’t need to be.

If the urge to accept a counteroffer hits you, continue to clean out your desk as you count your blessings… you’re on to something better.

Key ideas from this article have been taken from “Counteroffer Acceptance: Road to Career Ruin” by Paul Hawkinson, NATIONAL BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT WEEKLY (Published by the Wall Street Journal: Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

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P.R.E.S.S. Yourself to Look, Act and Feel Confident.

In a job interview, you always want to conduct yourself in a manner that exudes self esteem and confidence because let’s face it; you will never land a job you don’t believe you will get.  The secret to instantly appearing confident is P.R.E.S.S., which stands for: 

  • Posture Straight
  • Relaxed Body
  • Eye Contact
  • Smiling
  • Speak Clearly

 Now I know what you’re saying to yourself – “Clever acronym and we get it, but how is this image speaking clearly?”  Well friends, Dr. Cox has an abundance of confidence that shows almost everyday. He is confident and exudes positive self esteem, for himself at least. Even though he can be hard on his interns, they all look up to him and strive to be like him.

Dress your best when interviewing!

Dressing in appropriate attire is crucial for the interview. The first judgment an interviewer makes is going to be based on how you look and what you are wearing. That’s why it’s always important to dress professionally for a job interview, even if the work environment is casual. It’s better to be over dressed than under dressed. Crazy costuming like Elliot and J.D. are showcasing isn’t going to give the best impression. Rather than think you are suited for their facility, the interviewer may think you’d be better off working at a Renaissance Faire. If you’re STILL not sure on how to dress, then we recommend checking in with your recruiter.

Do your homework before the interview.

A crucial element in successful interview preparation is having significant knowledge about the hospital or company you are interviewing with so you can demonstrate your enthusiasm, as well as be able to articulate how your skills and values match those of the organization.  But these days, your research shouldn’t just come from a quick Google search or a glance at their website.  Using LinkedIn and other social media tools to review the background of the hospital and your interviewers could be just the leg up you need in this competitive job market.  Remember, you can never know “too much” about an organization and interviewers are always impressed when you can ask informed, intelligent questions.

Had Taylor Maddox done her homework maybe she would still be the Chief of Medicine at Sacred Heart. Instead, Taylor’s money-fueled tendencies were at odds with Sacred Heart’s policies. Her preference for keeping patients with Cadillac health insurance plans in longer didn’t fit with their values. With rubbing everyone the wrong way, it was no surprise that Taylor was going to get the boot.

Focus on staying focused!

An interview is not a casual chat, it’s a meeting held with the purpose of determining if you have the skills, experience, character and motivation that the hiring manager is looking for. Listening and paying attention is just as important as answering questions because if you’re not paying attention, you’re not going to be able to give a good response.  Don’t be dreaming about the next scene you will be writing in your play, like J.D. here with the script for “Dr. Acula.” Your thoughts should be focused on the interview, not on your outside hobbies. There is plenty of other time to worry about the production of your tale of a vampire doctor.

Be yourself, everyone else is taken up!

Employers want people, not just skills and “Tell me about yourself” is one of the most common questions they will ask.  Don’t pretend to be someone else, like the Janitor who is notorious for pretending to be a doctor at Sacred Heart. This is your time to shine so be professional, but allow your personality to come through as you tell them all about your skills and experience.  Focus on your strengths and avoid bringing up skills that aren’t required for the position.  If you don’t know how to answer a question, just say so and ask for clarification. Remember, there’s no need to pretend to be someone you’re not like Janitor.

Don’t be a Bob Bummer – Attitude is key

Dr. Kelso’s life isn’t easy. His wife of 44 years is a wheelchair-bound paraplegic and he lost his beloved dog, Baxter. Disappointment in his family members’ choices is also a constant topic of discussion when chatting with Dr. Kelso. While we all have our personal lives, it can sometimes affect our attitudes and productivity at work, as well as the way we are perceived in a job interview. It’s important to remember to keep a line between your private life and work life. Your interviewer does not want to know all the details of your personal woes as it is likely to color their assessment of you. Avoid becoming a Bob Bummer like Dr. Kelso and sending the wrong message.

Interview Tips from ‘Scrubs’

So you’ve just landed yourself an interview for a wonderful job!  Now what?

Luckily for you, J.D. and the cast of characters at “Scrubs” can offer up some advice.  After all, aside from providing a half-hour of comedy, “Scrubs” focuses on the lives of medical practitioners.  In addition to making us laugh, the show teaches us a lot about how to behave, or rather, how not to behave in a professional work environment.  To explore this more, the good folks at Mountain Medical have gathered up some of the most memorable interview tips “Scrubs” has provided us through the years and will post them for you throughout the upcoming weeks.  We hope that while you prepare for your interview, you keep these tips in mind.  Good Luck!