Monthly Archives: June 2012

Supreme Court upholds ‘Obamacare’ ruling law constitutional

The Washington Insider

 Today, in a landmark decision, the Supreme Court ruled that President Obama’s signature piece of legislation, the Affordable Care Act is constitutional and will remain the law of the land. The Supreme Court challenge to the legislation centered on the “individual mandate” which requires all citizens purchase health insurance or face a substantial fine. The mandate was added to the legislation as a funding mechanism so that the legislation would end up, at worst, a revenue-neutral law.  With the law ruled constitutional, the popular provisions with the general public like allowing children to stay on their parents’ health insurance until age 26 and not allowing insurance companies to deny coverage for preexisting conditions will remain law.

Generally, pundits and Supreme Court scholars were surprised by the decision. Based on the oral arguments presented by the government and the laws opponents at the end of March, conventional wisdom pointed to the law being overturned. While certainly controversial at this moment, it remains to be seen what effect this decision will have on November’s Presidential Election. 

 

Preparing for the New Member of Your Team

Bringing your new physician, advanced practitioner or executive up to speed as quickly as possible is a crucial first step in their success.

 Welcome your new employee – Introduce them to the team and other key colleagues.  A great way to start the day is a welcome breakfast or coffee.  Not only will it welcome your new employee, but your team will love the treats as well! Unlike House, make sure your welcome is sincere. His sarcasm was easily detectable when Martha Masters joined his team.

  • Workspace – This should go without saying, but be sure that your new hire has everything ready to go in their work area including computer software, phone, email, etc.
  • Assign a team member to help out – It’s a great way for a new employee to bond with a team member and put them at ease.
  • Give them the low down – Go over processes, current issues, patients, and other key information that they need to do their job.  Also, be clear about your expectations of the person and this position.

 

House Hiring Tip #7 – The Cost of a Bad Hire

Hiring the wrong person can affect not only your organization’s bottom line, but your team’s morale and productivity as well. In fact, the average hiring mistake can cost up to three-times the annual salary of the position, considering the cost of termination, replacement, and loss of productivity during training and learning curve.  Taking steps to ensure that you’re on track to hire the right person is key to prevent a bad decision, so be sure to.

Ask detailed questions during the interview process and listen for insight into why someone says they’re “dependable” or “a team player.”  Always ask for examples to support their statements. 

  • Interview, interview, interview – The phone screen, a first interview and then bringing the top candidates back in for a final, or second interview to see the candidate in your setting and interact with your team is crucial. Personality and group dynamics should always be considered – strong personalities like House’s unique outlook may conflict with your team and lead to exasperated staff likeWilson.
  • Check References – Be sure you get at least three references.  Former managers and co-workers are good choices.  For the more junior positions, college professors are fine as well. 
  • Be confident you have the right candidate for the right job – you may interview someone and think that they “could” be a good fit for the position, but may lack some of the skills or experience.  Focus on the job description to stay on track to select the right person for the position.

 

House Hiring Tip #6 – References

“I’ve found that when you want to know the truth about someone that someone is probably the last person you should ask.” –  Dr. Greg House

Ever wary of trusting anyone, House would appreciate the next crucial step in the process, which can shed some light onto the candidate.

Speaking with a candidate’s references is not just to determine an applicant’s weaknesses, but to gain insight into the candidate’s personality, work style and ethics.  References should add to the snapshot you’re creating of the candidate.

To get the most out of your reference calls:

Speak with a variety of contacts – A peer, manager and perhaps a direct report will help you get a perspective on the candidate from different view points.

  • Get the facts – Confirm dates, position title and responsibilities.  Get qualitative information to gain insight into the candidate’s work style.  How does the person work with others?  Are they a team player or lone ranger?
  • Listen – People will often reveal a great deal about someone if you ask an open ended question and just listen.  Include inquiries into skill level, professionalism, strengths and weaknesses, and other points that are relevant to your position.
  • Know the law – You must always get permission from the candidate to speak with their references.  Be sure you understand the EEOC guidelines for conducting a reference check as well.