Tag Archives: professionalism

More on Resume Fraud

August 21, 2012 By Leave a Comment

By Maureen Aylward

The CEO of Yahoo lied on his resume and was forced out. Several other high profile CEOs have done the same in industry and academia. We asked our Zintro experts to offer tools and ideas that boards of directors or company executives can use to research and combat resume fraud.
Don Richard, a healthcare services director and recruiter, says that people are waking up to the reality that the competition for top talent is here to stay. “Unfortunately, few have woken up to the reality that it is not as simple as once thought to trust the resumes of the individuals being considered for top posts in organizations,” he says. “As a recruiter, I have spent the last 12 years finding the best talent for clients, and I am still shocked when I hear stories like the dismissal of the Yahoo CEO for an oversight that seems so easily avoidable.”

Richard says that it may seem counterintuitive to think that paying a top recruiter can save a company money, but consider the cost of hiring the wrong employee. “An experienced recruiter brings years of expertise in evaluating human capital to the job and takes the time to research the historical background of each candidate,” says Richard. “The internet has made it easier to verify facts if you know where to look and take the time to conduct the research. That is where a trained nationally certified recruiter would be a great benefit.”

Warren Olson, a former high profile private investigator in Southeast Asia, says as a rule of thumb, he advises company directors/HR executives to take little notice of academic credentials until such time as you have made a shortlist of candidates. “At that stage, without exception, employers must validate all documentation by contacting the alleged issuing body directly and asking for confirmation,” he says. “In this day and age, fraudulent certification can be produced in moments. In South East Asia, fake copies often originating from Malaysia are identical to the real thing.”

Olson says that as a basic reference, ask the candidate to name his or her mentors. “You spend a number of years completing degrees and work closely with course mentors, so any legitimate graduate will know immediately who taught or coached them,” he says.

What do you think?

http://blog.zintro.com/2012/08/21/more-on-resume-fraud/

 

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House Hiring Tip #6 – References

“I’ve found that when you want to know the truth about someone that someone is probably the last person you should ask.” –  Dr. Greg House

Ever wary of trusting anyone, House would appreciate the next crucial step in the process, which can shed some light onto the candidate.

Speaking with a candidate’s references is not just to determine an applicant’s weaknesses, but to gain insight into the candidate’s personality, work style and ethics.  References should add to the snapshot you’re creating of the candidate.

To get the most out of your reference calls:

Speak with a variety of contacts – A peer, manager and perhaps a direct report will help you get a perspective on the candidate from different view points.

  • Get the facts – Confirm dates, position title and responsibilities.  Get qualitative information to gain insight into the candidate’s work style.  How does the person work with others?  Are they a team player or lone ranger?
  • Listen – People will often reveal a great deal about someone if you ask an open ended question and just listen.  Include inquiries into skill level, professionalism, strengths and weaknesses, and other points that are relevant to your position.
  • Know the law – You must always get permission from the candidate to speak with their references.  Be sure you understand the EEOC guidelines for conducting a reference check as well.

Research, Research, Research…

Everyone is waking up to the reality that the competition for top talent is here to stay. Unfortunately few have woken up to the reality that it is not as simple as once thought to trust the resumes of the individuals being considered for top posts in these organizations.

As a recruiter I have spent the last 12 years  finding the best talent for my clients and I am still shocked when I hear stories like the recent dismissal of the Yahoo CEO for an oversight that seems so easily avoidable.

ADP Screening and Selection Services, a unit of the Roseland, N.J.-based ADP payroll and benefits managing company, says that in performing 2.6 million background checks in 2001, it found that 44 percent of applicants lied about their work histories, 41 percent lied about their education, and 23 percent falsified credentials or licenses.

It may seem counterintuitive to think that paying a top recruiter can save you money, but consider the cost of hiring the wrong employee. An experienced recruiter brings years of expertise in evaluating human capital to the job. A reputable recruiter takes the time to understand and research the historical background of each candidate they represent. Each and every piece of a candidates resume must be researched thoroughly for accuracy. The internet has made it easier to verify facts if you know where to look and take the time to conduct the research. That is where a trained nationally certified recruiter would be a great benefit. Certification ensures knowledgeable, experienced recruiters meld the right candidate with the right company and that they follow the rules clearly defined by the federal, state and local government.

House Hiring Tip #2 – Power Networking

Networking – the art of connecting, socializing and interacting with colleagues – is an essential piece to finding the best candidate for your physician, advanced practice and executive healthcare positions. We say it to candidates all the time, but as a hiring manager, are you using networking to your advantage? Have you added social media to your networking?

Social networking through LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook is a great way to maintain and develop relationships and keep your finger on the pulse of who’s who. Social networks are where you want to be to tap into talent – Studies show that 1 in 6 job seekers found their last job through an online social network, and 86% percent of job seekers have a social network profile. Demonstrate your medical industry expertise on LinkedIn by answering your network’s Questions and interacting in Groups. You can also utilize a blog to showcase and share industry specific knowledge, which can be shared across all social platforms to resonate a buzz.

Don’t dismiss the power of networking – you never know when a highly qualified doctor like Foreman will tell his “House,” “I don’t want to turn into you” and seek a new position.

We work with medical professionals all day, every day. We’d love to help expand your networking capabilities and get you connected with the best talent in the business.

Did you miss Tip #1 Writing the Job Description?

Stand by for House’s next tip, What To Look for In Resumes.

House Hiring Tip #1 – The First Step to Hiring Lucky #13: Writing the Job Description

Putting a job description together seems simple enough, right? But if not constructed precisely, you may find yourself buried waist deep with resumes from candidates that don’t hit the mark, especially in this economy. Thus, the first step is crucial in communicating to prospective candidates exactly what you’re looking for.

While House resorted to numbering his candidates 1 through 40 and slowly eliminating them, specific and detailed job descriptions will lower the chances of having to sort through piles of unqualified candidates. He eventually chose #13, but with much wasted time and effort.

A great way to approach the job description is to think of it as a “reverse resume.” This will help you organize the skills you’re seeking to provide a snapshot of the responsibilities and tasks the job entails. Don’t rely solely on a job’s history as you’re putting together a job description for today. Focus instead on what the job needs to be in light of the organization’s current needs and long-term objectives.

A well-written job description consists of more than a laundry list of the tasks and responsibilities that the job entails. It reflects a sense of priorities.

A task is what the person in the job will actually do. Qualifications are the skills, attributes, or credentials a person needs to perform each task. Clarify the actual tasks and responsibilities before you start thinking about what special attributes will be needed by the person who will be fulfilling those responsibilities.

Credentials (such as degrees and licenses) are absolute necessities in some jobs. The thing you want to make sure of, however, is that whatever credentials you establish have a direct bearing on the candidate’s ability to become a top performer.

The job you describe must be truly doable. When you’re lumping several tasks into the same job description, make sure that you’re not creating a job that very few people could fill.

Last but not least, it’s always a clever idea to review the description with your manager and other team members to be sure you haven’t missed anything.

Confidence is key in a succesful job search

Very few situations in life can hurt your confidence and self esteem as much as trying to find a job. It is extremely difficult to keep a positive attitude especially in the current economic environment.

The formal process of finding a new job may seem like it is draining the life out of you. It might seem as if it is taking the best parts of you away when you need them most. You cannot let this happen. Losing confidence did not happen in one day and it will not come back fully in a day either.

You need to take small steps each day toward your overall goal. Things will get better but until then, here are a few tips to keep you confident and strong.

Set daily and weekly goals for yourself. And achieve a majority of them.  Prove to yourself each week that you are getting somewhere in your search.

Find a career expert. Connect with an employment expert who can help you through this process.  A recruiter, career coach or resume writer can help a great deal.  A certified recruiter will have the inside track on a companies hiring plan before they make it public knowledge or they will be able to market your skills to a company who has a current need.

Always be ready to interview. Stop thinking about the ways you have always done things and be open to new ideas and techniques.  Research interview styles and prepare yourself with possible questions you could be asked.

Keep your mind sharp. Engage in activities which could expand your skills and value as a job applicant. Take a class or read a book on a skill that you have always wanted to add to your resume but never found the time earlier. This is a great time to do the things you have dreamed of.

P.R.E.S.S. Yourself to Look, Act and Feel Confident.

In a job interview, you always want to conduct yourself in a manner that exudes self esteem and confidence because let’s face it; you will never land a job you don’t believe you will get.  The secret to instantly appearing confident is P.R.E.S.S., which stands for: 

  • Posture Straight
  • Relaxed Body
  • Eye Contact
  • Smiling
  • Speak Clearly

 Now I know what you’re saying to yourself – “Clever acronym and we get it, but how is this image speaking clearly?”  Well friends, Dr. Cox has an abundance of confidence that shows almost everyday. He is confident and exudes positive self esteem, for himself at least. Even though he can be hard on his interns, they all look up to him and strive to be like him.

Dress your best when interviewing!

Dressing in appropriate attire is crucial for the interview. The first judgment an interviewer makes is going to be based on how you look and what you are wearing. That’s why it’s always important to dress professionally for a job interview, even if the work environment is casual. It’s better to be over dressed than under dressed. Crazy costuming like Elliot and J.D. are showcasing isn’t going to give the best impression. Rather than think you are suited for their facility, the interviewer may think you’d be better off working at a Renaissance Faire. If you’re STILL not sure on how to dress, then we recommend checking in with your recruiter.

Do your homework before the interview.

A crucial element in successful interview preparation is having significant knowledge about the hospital or company you are interviewing with so you can demonstrate your enthusiasm, as well as be able to articulate how your skills and values match those of the organization.  But these days, your research shouldn’t just come from a quick Google search or a glance at their website.  Using LinkedIn and other social media tools to review the background of the hospital and your interviewers could be just the leg up you need in this competitive job market.  Remember, you can never know “too much” about an organization and interviewers are always impressed when you can ask informed, intelligent questions.

Had Taylor Maddox done her homework maybe she would still be the Chief of Medicine at Sacred Heart. Instead, Taylor’s money-fueled tendencies were at odds with Sacred Heart’s policies. Her preference for keeping patients with Cadillac health insurance plans in longer didn’t fit with their values. With rubbing everyone the wrong way, it was no surprise that Taylor was going to get the boot.

Focus on staying focused!

An interview is not a casual chat, it’s a meeting held with the purpose of determining if you have the skills, experience, character and motivation that the hiring manager is looking for. Listening and paying attention is just as important as answering questions because if you’re not paying attention, you’re not going to be able to give a good response.  Don’t be dreaming about the next scene you will be writing in your play, like J.D. here with the script for “Dr. Acula.” Your thoughts should be focused on the interview, not on your outside hobbies. There is plenty of other time to worry about the production of your tale of a vampire doctor.