Category Archives: Candidates

Keeping Your Team Motivated

 

Congratulations!  You’ve hired a new team member! They’re up and running, but how do you keep your new hire and team inspired? If you take a cue from House, you’ll know that you must keep the team challenged but also need to offer guidance.

 In order for your team to be efficient, they need to stay motivated. But it can be a challenge so remember that as a manager it’s important that you… 

 Take the time to define your management style – You cant inspire a team if you don’t understand how to effectively manage.

  • Get to know each team member and their work style – A team is a team, but it’s comprised of individuals. Don’t lose sight of that.
  • Communicate efficiently – Knowing that communication is key and providing a clear vision can keep your team productive.
  • Invest in your team – They need to understand their role in your team’s initiatives and that they are essential to your organization’s success.

 We hope you’ve enjoyed our HOUSE series and that our tips have provided you some food for thought.  Keep in mind that you’re not alone; we’re here for you (and we won’t roll our eyes!). We work with managers every day to provide guidance and insight into hiring and retention practices.

 

Supreme Court upholds ‘Obamacare’ ruling law constitutional

The Washington Insider

 Today, in a landmark decision, the Supreme Court ruled that President Obama’s signature piece of legislation, the Affordable Care Act is constitutional and will remain the law of the land. The Supreme Court challenge to the legislation centered on the “individual mandate” which requires all citizens purchase health insurance or face a substantial fine. The mandate was added to the legislation as a funding mechanism so that the legislation would end up, at worst, a revenue-neutral law.  With the law ruled constitutional, the popular provisions with the general public like allowing children to stay on their parents’ health insurance until age 26 and not allowing insurance companies to deny coverage for preexisting conditions will remain law.

Generally, pundits and Supreme Court scholars were surprised by the decision. Based on the oral arguments presented by the government and the laws opponents at the end of March, conventional wisdom pointed to the law being overturned. While certainly controversial at this moment, it remains to be seen what effect this decision will have on November’s Presidential Election. 

 

Research, Research, Research…

Everyone is waking up to the reality that the competition for top talent is here to stay. Unfortunately few have woken up to the reality that it is not as simple as once thought to trust the resumes of the individuals being considered for top posts in these organizations.

As a recruiter I have spent the last 12 years  finding the best talent for my clients and I am still shocked when I hear stories like the recent dismissal of the Yahoo CEO for an oversight that seems so easily avoidable.

ADP Screening and Selection Services, a unit of the Roseland, N.J.-based ADP payroll and benefits managing company, says that in performing 2.6 million background checks in 2001, it found that 44 percent of applicants lied about their work histories, 41 percent lied about their education, and 23 percent falsified credentials or licenses.

It may seem counterintuitive to think that paying a top recruiter can save you money, but consider the cost of hiring the wrong employee. An experienced recruiter brings years of expertise in evaluating human capital to the job. A reputable recruiter takes the time to understand and research the historical background of each candidate they represent. Each and every piece of a candidates resume must be researched thoroughly for accuracy. The internet has made it easier to verify facts if you know where to look and take the time to conduct the research. That is where a trained nationally certified recruiter would be a great benefit. Certification ensures knowledgeable, experienced recruiters meld the right candidate with the right company and that they follow the rules clearly defined by the federal, state and local government.

Dr. House on Hiring – Diagnosis & Treatment

Hiring and managing healthcare and medical staff is not always easy and while at times taping one’s mouth closed may seem like a viable option, we hope our tips give you a better choice! Hugh Laurie’s character Gregory House, M.D., of the hit series HOUSE, is sarcastic and dubious, but also very intelligent as he uses those traits to his advantage. Despite his coveted ability to find the mysterious diagnosis and last minute life saving treatment, he’s not easy to work with or work for. Courtesy of this quirky and unconventional doctor, we’ll provide some insights on interacting with candidates and keeping your team motivated.

“We all make mistakes, and we all pay a price,” according to House, and knowledge is power when it comes to hiring practices and team building.

Tip #1 coming soon!

Poll: Can the ACA survive if the Supreme Court strikes down the individual mandate section?

Confidence is key in a succesful job search

Very few situations in life can hurt your confidence and self esteem as much as trying to find a job. It is extremely difficult to keep a positive attitude especially in the current economic environment.

The formal process of finding a new job may seem like it is draining the life out of you. It might seem as if it is taking the best parts of you away when you need them most. You cannot let this happen. Losing confidence did not happen in one day and it will not come back fully in a day either.

You need to take small steps each day toward your overall goal. Things will get better but until then, here are a few tips to keep you confident and strong.

Set daily and weekly goals for yourself. And achieve a majority of them.  Prove to yourself each week that you are getting somewhere in your search.

Find a career expert. Connect with an employment expert who can help you through this process.  A recruiter, career coach or resume writer can help a great deal.  A certified recruiter will have the inside track on a companies hiring plan before they make it public knowledge or they will be able to market your skills to a company who has a current need.

Always be ready to interview. Stop thinking about the ways you have always done things and be open to new ideas and techniques.  Research interview styles and prepare yourself with possible questions you could be asked.

Keep your mind sharp. Engage in activities which could expand your skills and value as a job applicant. Take a class or read a book on a skill that you have always wanted to add to your resume but never found the time earlier. This is a great time to do the things you have dreamed of.

Counter offer? Why would I accept a counter offer?

Let’s face it: When someone quits, it’s often a poor a reflection on the boss. Unless you’re really incompetent or a destructive thorn in his side, the boss might look bad by “allowing” you to go. His immediate gut reaction is to do whatever it takes to keep you from leaving until he’s ready for you to go on his terms – that’s human nature.  Unfortunately for your boss, it’s also human nature to want to stay where you’re comfortable unless your work life is utter misery.  Career changes, like all ventures into the unknown, are tough. That’s why bosses know they can usually entice you to stay by pressing the right buttons.

Before you succumb to a tempting counteroffer, consider these universal employment truths:

  • Any situation in which an employee is forced to get an outside offer before the present employer will suggest a raise, promotion or better working conditions, is cause for suspicion.
  • No matter what your company says when making its counteroffer, from now on you’ll be considered a fidelity risk. Having now demonstrated your lack of loyalty (for whatever reason) to the company, you’ll lose your status as a “team player” and your place in the inner circle.
  • Counteroffers are usually nothing more than a stalling device to give your employer time to replace you.
  • Your reasons for wanting to leave still exist. Conditions are just made a bit more tolerable in the short term because of the raise, promotion or promises made to keep you. You also have no way of knowing to what extent these promises will be kept.
  • The potential opportunities your new position can provide will most likely outweigh what your current company has been willing to provide (or you wouldn’t have sought something new!).

The bottom line: Counteroffers are only made in response to a threat to quit. Will you have to solicit an offer and threaten to quit every time you deserve better working conditions?

Companies in sync with their employees don’t need to make counteroffers… EVER! Their policies are fair and equitable, and they are in touch with your level of job satisfaction. They won’t be subjected to “counteroffer coercion” or what they perceive as blackmail, and they won’t need to be.

If the urge to accept a counteroffer hits you, continue to clean out your desk as you count your blessings… you’re on to something better.

Key ideas from this article have been taken from “Counteroffer Acceptance: Road to Career Ruin” by Paul Hawkinson, NATIONAL BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT WEEKLY (Published by the Wall Street Journal: Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

The Art of the ‘Follow Up’

Working in the medicine field you know that you have to follow up with your patients. Had J.D. and Dr. Cox not followed up with frequent patient Jill Tracy, she might have died. Things are no different when interviewing for a position.

Without follow up your chances for the job could die. The ways in which you go about the follow up can either categorize you as an amateur or a pro. So, how do you follow up like a pro?

Before the interview comes to end, make sure you ask the interviewer for the next steps and for their business card.  This will come in handy when sending the thank you note. If you have used the services of a recruiter, call them immediately after the interview before sending the thank you.  Some clients prefer not to be contacted directly by candidates and getting expert advice is always better than guessing.

Following up helped J.D.’s patient and it will help you in the job hunt.

P.R.E.S.S. Yourself to Look, Act and Feel Confident.

In a job interview, you always want to conduct yourself in a manner that exudes self esteem and confidence because let’s face it; you will never land a job you don’t believe you will get.  The secret to instantly appearing confident is P.R.E.S.S., which stands for: 

  • Posture Straight
  • Relaxed Body
  • Eye Contact
  • Smiling
  • Speak Clearly

 Now I know what you’re saying to yourself – “Clever acronym and we get it, but how is this image speaking clearly?”  Well friends, Dr. Cox has an abundance of confidence that shows almost everyday. He is confident and exudes positive self esteem, for himself at least. Even though he can be hard on his interns, they all look up to him and strive to be like him.

Do your homework before the interview.

A crucial element in successful interview preparation is having significant knowledge about the hospital or company you are interviewing with so you can demonstrate your enthusiasm, as well as be able to articulate how your skills and values match those of the organization.  But these days, your research shouldn’t just come from a quick Google search or a glance at their website.  Using LinkedIn and other social media tools to review the background of the hospital and your interviewers could be just the leg up you need in this competitive job market.  Remember, you can never know “too much” about an organization and interviewers are always impressed when you can ask informed, intelligent questions.

Had Taylor Maddox done her homework maybe she would still be the Chief of Medicine at Sacred Heart. Instead, Taylor’s money-fueled tendencies were at odds with Sacred Heart’s policies. Her preference for keeping patients with Cadillac health insurance plans in longer didn’t fit with their values. With rubbing everyone the wrong way, it was no surprise that Taylor was going to get the boot.