House Hiring Tip #2 – Power Networking

Networking – the art of connecting, socializing and interacting with colleagues – is an essential piece to finding the best candidate for your physician, advanced practice and executive healthcare positions. We say it to candidates all the time, but as a hiring manager, are you using networking to your advantage? Have you added social media to your networking?

Social networking through LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook is a great way to maintain and develop relationships and keep your finger on the pulse of who’s who. Social networks are where you want to be to tap into talent – Studies show that 1 in 6 job seekers found their last job through an online social network, and 86% percent of job seekers have a social network profile. Demonstrate your medical industry expertise on LinkedIn by answering your network’s Questions and interacting in Groups. You can also utilize a blog to showcase and share industry specific knowledge, which can be shared across all social platforms to resonate a buzz.

Don’t dismiss the power of networking – you never know when a highly qualified doctor like Foreman will tell his “House,” “I don’t want to turn into you” and seek a new position.

We work with medical professionals all day, every day. We’d love to help expand your networking capabilities and get you connected with the best talent in the business.

Did you miss Tip #1 Writing the Job Description?

Stand by for House’s next tip, What To Look for In Resumes.

House Hiring Tip #1 – The First Step to Hiring Lucky #13: Writing the Job Description

Putting a job description together seems simple enough, right? But if not constructed precisely, you may find yourself buried waist deep with resumes from candidates that don’t hit the mark, especially in this economy. Thus, the first step is crucial in communicating to prospective candidates exactly what you’re looking for.

While House resorted to numbering his candidates 1 through 40 and slowly eliminating them, specific and detailed job descriptions will lower the chances of having to sort through piles of unqualified candidates. He eventually chose #13, but with much wasted time and effort.

A great way to approach the job description is to think of it as a “reverse resume.” This will help you organize the skills you’re seeking to provide a snapshot of the responsibilities and tasks the job entails. Don’t rely solely on a job’s history as you’re putting together a job description for today. Focus instead on what the job needs to be in light of the organization’s current needs and long-term objectives.

A well-written job description consists of more than a laundry list of the tasks and responsibilities that the job entails. It reflects a sense of priorities.

A task is what the person in the job will actually do. Qualifications are the skills, attributes, or credentials a person needs to perform each task. Clarify the actual tasks and responsibilities before you start thinking about what special attributes will be needed by the person who will be fulfilling those responsibilities.

Credentials (such as degrees and licenses) are absolute necessities in some jobs. The thing you want to make sure of, however, is that whatever credentials you establish have a direct bearing on the candidate’s ability to become a top performer.

The job you describe must be truly doable. When you’re lumping several tasks into the same job description, make sure that you’re not creating a job that very few people could fill.

Last but not least, it’s always a clever idea to review the description with your manager and other team members to be sure you haven’t missed anything.

Don Richard – Vlog14: NAPR 2012 – Where do we go from here?

Where do we go from here?

Later this summer the Supreme Court will provide their view of the Affordable Care Act’s constitutionality. Even if they strike down all or part of it, what’s next? Changes have to be made somewhere if we are to fend of the coming health care crisis. Will Congress finally put aside party views and come to an acceptable agreement? Too many questions, not enough answers.

Please visit the MOUNTAIN MEDICAL website and give me a call.

http://www.mountainmedsearch.com/

Dr. House on Hiring – Diagnosis & Treatment

Hiring and managing healthcare and medical staff is not always easy and while at times taping one’s mouth closed may seem like a viable option, we hope our tips give you a better choice! Hugh Laurie’s character Gregory House, M.D., of the hit series HOUSE, is sarcastic and dubious, but also very intelligent as he uses those traits to his advantage. Despite his coveted ability to find the mysterious diagnosis and last minute life saving treatment, he’s not easy to work with or work for. Courtesy of this quirky and unconventional doctor, we’ll provide some insights on interacting with candidates and keeping your team motivated.

“We all make mistakes, and we all pay a price,” according to House, and knowledge is power when it comes to hiring practices and team building.

Tip #1 coming soon!

Poll: Can the ACA survive if the Supreme Court strikes down the individual mandate section?

Confidence is key in a succesful job search

Very few situations in life can hurt your confidence and self esteem as much as trying to find a job. It is extremely difficult to keep a positive attitude especially in the current economic environment.

The formal process of finding a new job may seem like it is draining the life out of you. It might seem as if it is taking the best parts of you away when you need them most. You cannot let this happen. Losing confidence did not happen in one day and it will not come back fully in a day either.

You need to take small steps each day toward your overall goal. Things will get better but until then, here are a few tips to keep you confident and strong.

Set daily and weekly goals for yourself. And achieve a majority of them.  Prove to yourself each week that you are getting somewhere in your search.

Find a career expert. Connect with an employment expert who can help you through this process.  A recruiter, career coach or resume writer can help a great deal.  A certified recruiter will have the inside track on a companies hiring plan before they make it public knowledge or they will be able to market your skills to a company who has a current need.

Always be ready to interview. Stop thinking about the ways you have always done things and be open to new ideas and techniques.  Research interview styles and prepare yourself with possible questions you could be asked.

Keep your mind sharp. Engage in activities which could expand your skills and value as a job applicant. Take a class or read a book on a skill that you have always wanted to add to your resume but never found the time earlier. This is a great time to do the things you have dreamed of.

Counter offer? Why would I accept a counter offer?

Let’s face it: When someone quits, it’s often a poor a reflection on the boss. Unless you’re really incompetent or a destructive thorn in his side, the boss might look bad by “allowing” you to go. His immediate gut reaction is to do whatever it takes to keep you from leaving until he’s ready for you to go on his terms – that’s human nature.  Unfortunately for your boss, it’s also human nature to want to stay where you’re comfortable unless your work life is utter misery.  Career changes, like all ventures into the unknown, are tough. That’s why bosses know they can usually entice you to stay by pressing the right buttons.

Before you succumb to a tempting counteroffer, consider these universal employment truths:

  • Any situation in which an employee is forced to get an outside offer before the present employer will suggest a raise, promotion or better working conditions, is cause for suspicion.
  • No matter what your company says when making its counteroffer, from now on you’ll be considered a fidelity risk. Having now demonstrated your lack of loyalty (for whatever reason) to the company, you’ll lose your status as a “team player” and your place in the inner circle.
  • Counteroffers are usually nothing more than a stalling device to give your employer time to replace you.
  • Your reasons for wanting to leave still exist. Conditions are just made a bit more tolerable in the short term because of the raise, promotion or promises made to keep you. You also have no way of knowing to what extent these promises will be kept.
  • The potential opportunities your new position can provide will most likely outweigh what your current company has been willing to provide (or you wouldn’t have sought something new!).

The bottom line: Counteroffers are only made in response to a threat to quit. Will you have to solicit an offer and threaten to quit every time you deserve better working conditions?

Companies in sync with their employees don’t need to make counteroffers… EVER! Their policies are fair and equitable, and they are in touch with your level of job satisfaction. They won’t be subjected to “counteroffer coercion” or what they perceive as blackmail, and they won’t need to be.

If the urge to accept a counteroffer hits you, continue to clean out your desk as you count your blessings… you’re on to something better.

Key ideas from this article have been taken from “Counteroffer Acceptance: Road to Career Ruin” by Paul Hawkinson, NATIONAL BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT WEEKLY (Published by the Wall Street Journal: Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

The Art of the ‘Follow Up’

Working in the medicine field you know that you have to follow up with your patients. Had J.D. and Dr. Cox not followed up with frequent patient Jill Tracy, she might have died. Things are no different when interviewing for a position.

Without follow up your chances for the job could die. The ways in which you go about the follow up can either categorize you as an amateur or a pro. So, how do you follow up like a pro?

Before the interview comes to end, make sure you ask the interviewer for the next steps and for their business card.  This will come in handy when sending the thank you note. If you have used the services of a recruiter, call them immediately after the interview before sending the thank you.  Some clients prefer not to be contacted directly by candidates and getting expert advice is always better than guessing.

Following up helped J.D.’s patient and it will help you in the job hunt.

P.R.E.S.S. Yourself to Look, Act and Feel Confident.

In a job interview, you always want to conduct yourself in a manner that exudes self esteem and confidence because let’s face it; you will never land a job you don’t believe you will get.  The secret to instantly appearing confident is P.R.E.S.S., which stands for: 

  • Posture Straight
  • Relaxed Body
  • Eye Contact
  • Smiling
  • Speak Clearly

 Now I know what you’re saying to yourself – “Clever acronym and we get it, but how is this image speaking clearly?”  Well friends, Dr. Cox has an abundance of confidence that shows almost everyday. He is confident and exudes positive self esteem, for himself at least. Even though he can be hard on his interns, they all look up to him and strive to be like him.

Dress your best when interviewing!

Dressing in appropriate attire is crucial for the interview. The first judgment an interviewer makes is going to be based on how you look and what you are wearing. That’s why it’s always important to dress professionally for a job interview, even if the work environment is casual. It’s better to be over dressed than under dressed. Crazy costuming like Elliot and J.D. are showcasing isn’t going to give the best impression. Rather than think you are suited for their facility, the interviewer may think you’d be better off working at a Renaissance Faire. If you’re STILL not sure on how to dress, then we recommend checking in with your recruiter.